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Golf ball 3D print modelReady for 3d printer

Espresso Cup Golf Ball Style 3D print model

Espresso Cup Golf Ball Style 3D print modelCreate 3D Print With Us At Innovative 3D Print Design. Microwave and dishwasher safe. Attractive…

Hand with Golf Ball Rigged Free 3D print model

Hand with Golf Ball Rigged free 3D print modelHi Ladys and GentlemansMy name is JoÃo Martins and today im just sharing with you guys a hand with a golf ball i…

Hand with Golf Ball Rigged Free VR / AR / lowpoly 3D print model

Hand with Golf Ball Rigged free low-poly 3d model ready for Virtual Reality (VR), Augmented Reality (AR), games and other real-time apps.Hi Ladys and GentlemansMy name is JoÃo Martins…

Golf Ball Marker Print Settings Printer: Monoprice Maker Select V2.1 Rafts: No Supports: No

A simple golf ball marker. Print Settings Printer: MP Select Mini Rafts: Doesnt Matter Supports: …

Accurate size Golf ball i created in solidworks . Support may be needed.Print with high infill

Golf Ball Marker Print Settings Printer Brand: Robo 3D Printer: R1 ABS + PLA Model Rafts: Yes …

Golf ball with hollow inside (It has a very small thickness so print carefully). Suggestions and hints are welcomed at any time, i will correct my mistakes in the future

Wiffle Golf Ball half solid for indoor chipping. Print Settings Rafts: Yes Supports: No Resolution: …

3D printed wiffle golf balls. I experimented with a number of different designed and I had the best luck with models d and e printed in nylon. I uploaded them all…

A great little trophy for golf events or friendly competitions. Can also be used as small gift for any passionate golfer. At standard scale the ball is approx. to true 1:1…

Created a standard golf ball tee for all your wedges and drivers. Print Settings Printer: Monoprice Maker Select 3D Printer V2 Rafts: …

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Iowa State Cyclones Golf Ball Marker

I made a custom Iowa State Cyclones Golf Ball Marker. I will print a version and upload a photo hopefully in the next couple days.

472909 3d models found for: golf ball print

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wikiHow

Every student in a junior high or high school science class has had to learn about the structures of living cells at some time or another. Perhaps you have recently taken your turn, learning about the various organelles of plant and animal cells. If you have decided to show off your recently acquired knowledge by creating a 3D model of the cell and its structures (or have been assigned to do so by a teacher), this article can help guide you through the process.

You must understand the primary organelles (cell components, essentially like the organs of the cell), their relation to one another, and the differences between plant and animal cells if you are going to construct an accurate 3D model.

You must know the different organelles if you are going to model them. Vitally, you must understand their shape. The colors usually given to the different cell components in text books are used for contrast and usually bear no resemblance to reality, so in that instance you can be creative. But you must develop the correct shapes in order to model them.

It is also important to know how the various cell structures relate to one another. For example, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is always located close to the nucleus because if processes the proteins that are used in DNA replication. You must understand this fact as you are creating your model.

Know the differences between plant and animal cells. Most importantly, plant cells have an exterior cell wall made of cellulose, contain very large vacuoles (a membrane-bound collection of water and enzymes), and possess chloroplasts (the portions of the plant cell that convert sunlight into usable energy).

Will your model be a transparent representation, with the cell components suspended in a see-through material? Will it instead be a cutaway model, giving the appearance of a cell that has been cut in half but containing organelles that provide a three-dimensional appearance? Instructions on how to construct two alternative styles of model appear later in this article, but will be summarized here:

The first option is a fully three-dimensional representation of a cell, with all of the organelles suspended in clear gelatin.

The second option involves using craft materials to construct a cut-away model that shows a cell with a section removed to facilitate viewing.

Think about the materials you would use.

The materials will obviously vary depending on the type of model you have decided to construct.

It is easiest to use items that already have the general shape of the object you are modeling–say, something roughly circular for a cell nucleus.

Of course, many of the organelles are shaped so strangely that it may be impossible to find something that already has the same appearance. In this case you should think of materials that are flexible and can be fitted to whatever appearance you need.

Will your 3D model be edible? What types of colors will you use for each organelle? Never lose sight of the vital elements that must be represented in this project, but the form of your model does not always have to limit its style and creativity.

Get the materials to make your cell parts.

Youll be making the parts of your cell out of various food and kitchen items. What you use is up to you but here are a few ideas:

Clear gelatin will work as the cytoplasm. If you are simply going for authenticity, non-flavored gelatin would work perfectly well. If you have decided to go edible, choose a variety that wont be so darkly colored as to obscure the model organelles you place inside.

For the nucleus, nucleolus and nuclear membrane: Purchase a pitted fruit, such as a plum or peach. The pit is the nucleolus, the fruit is the nucleus, and the skin is the nuclear membrane. (If you are not expected to deliver this level of complexity, a simple round food item will do).

Centrosomes are supposed to be spiky, try putting bits of toothpick through a gumdrop or other small gummy item.

Model the Golgi apparatus using cut-out pieces of cardboard, wafers, crackers, sliced bananas or, perhaps best yet, a fruit roll-up stacked like an accordion.

For the Lysosomes, use small, round candies or chocolate chips.

Mitochondrion are somewhat oblong, so try using lima beans or perhaps certain types of un-shelled nuts.

Ribosomes: For ribosomes, youll want something small. Try sprinkles, peppercorns, or plain pepper.

The rough endoplasmic reticulum looks much like Golgi apparatus, in that it is a structure of flat, folded sections clumped together; though unlike the Golgi apparatus it has a rough-looking surface. You could use similar materials for it, but try to find a way to stick something rough or textured to it (perhaps sprinkles) in order to make the two distinct.

The smooth endoplasmic reticulum looks more like a tangled and irregularly sized series of connected tubes. For this, youll want something smooth and bendy. Use cooked spaghetti, gummy worms, or stretched-out taffy.

Vacuole: For an animal cell, use a few moderately sized gumballs–ideally uniform in color, but with some transparent quality (there are essentially just sacks of water and enzymes, after all). Vacuoles in plant cells are much, much larger. If you really want to get tricky here, you could make a separate gelatin (perhaps made with the concentrated formula for extra rigidity) earlier and attempt to insert it into the model plant cell.

Microtubules can be modeled using uncooked pieces of spaghetti or, depending on the scale of your project, straws.

For chloroplasts (plant cell only), use peas, green jelly beans, or green beans cut in half. Keep them green.

Youll need a mold to make your cell in but youll need to decide what type of cell youre making first. Animal and plant cells have different shapes and will require different molds.

If youre making a plant cell, the first thing youll need is a rectangular baking dish, preferably made out of porcelain. The dish itself will be your cell wall and membrane, in your model.

If youre making an animal cell, youll want a round or oblong baking dish, like a casserole dish. This dish can be your cell membrane, or you can later remove the cell model from the dish and cover it in saran wrap cut to shape and size and call that the membrane.

Cook the gelatin according to the instructions on the box–it usually begins by boiling water on the stovetop, and then mixing the gelatin in. Carefully pour the hot liquid into the casserole dish or baking pan. Put in the fridge and let it set for about an hour, or until its almost hardened.

Do not wait until the gelatin has completely settled.

You want the gelatin to reform or solidify around the areas where you have inserted the model organelles.

If you cant find clear gelatin, buy the lightest color possible, like yellow or orange. You can alsomake gelatin from scratch.

Start putting your cell parts into the gelatin. Heres how you might want to arrange the pieces:

Put the nucleus near the middle (unless you are modeling a plant cell).

Place the centrosome near the nucleus.

Put the smooth endoplasmic reticulum near the nucleus.

Place the Golgi body near the nucleus (though farther away than the endoplasmic reticulum).

Add the rough endoplasmic reticulum onto the other side of the smooth endoplasmic reticulum (away from the nucleus).

Arrange everything else wherever you have room. Try not to crowd too much into one space. In a real cell, there are a few structures that float all around the cytoplasm. These can be mixed in almost randomly.

Put the model back into the refrigerator.

Allow the gelatin to settle for another hour or two until it is completely solidified.

Make a table or key that defines each part.

After youve added your cell pieces, write up a list of what part of a cell each item corresponds to (e.g., Gelatin = Cytoplasm, Licorice = Rough ER). Youll probably need to be able to tell people about the parts of your cell later on.

You can use a styrofoam cell base. Craft or art stores and will have styrofoam balls (if making an animal cell) roughly the size of a basketball or a styrofoam rectangular cube (if making a plant cell).

Cardstock can be used to form a number of cell structures, such as the Golgi apparatus or rough endoplasmic reticulum.

Straws or small hoses can be used to form tube-like structures. The microtubules could be constructed out of stirring straws, while flexible straws or tubes can be used to model the smooth endoplasmic reticulum.

Use beads of various sizes and shapes as other cell structures, such as mitochondria or chloroplasts. Try to keep them on an appropriate scale compared to the other structures in the model cell.

Modeling clay can be used to create any structure that is difficult to replicate using preexisting materials.

Paint can be used to fill in the cytoplasm and differentiate between it and the exterior of the cell. You can also paint any clay structures you have created.

Cut out a 1/4 section of the styrofoam base.

Measure the base and make dots at the points that equal half the length of a side. Draw lines showing where to cut. Then use an exacto knife or something similar to cut and remove a 1/4 section.

For the plant cell, do this by drawing the center line on any two adjoining sides and continue those lines all the way around until they circle back.

If doing this for the animal cell, draw the lines like you were making the equator and the meridians on a globe.

Paint the inside of the 1/4 section in order to help your cell parts stand out. You can also paint the outside in a different color to contrast it with the cytoplasm.

Create them from the craft items listed above.

The trickiest of these will be the parts that you must model out of clay. Keep these structures as simple as possible while remaining true to the basic structure you are modeling. It may be best to only make the simplest of structures out of clay and leave more complex parts–say, the smooth endoplasmic reticulum–to be replicated using tubes or some other item.

Add the parts to your cell base (the styrofoam). This can be done by using hot glue, regular glue, toothpicks, pins, staples, or a number of other methods. In some cases you may also need to literally dig or carve out space in the styrofoam to fit in the parts.

The Golgi apparatus and rough endoplasmic reticulum can be shaped out of cardstock using your hands. In this case, make slices into the styrofoam and slide pieces of cardstock in to form the folded shapes of these structures.

Make a table or key that defines each part.

After youve added your cell pieces, write up a list of what part of a cell each item corresponds to. Youll probably need to be able to tell people about the parts of your cell later on.

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What do I use for the nucleus and the nucleolus?

Thermal balls. These can vary in their sizes, which will help you to get the right size needed for the nucleus and the nucleolus.

It all depends on the materials you make them out of. Paper would be too fragile, but cardboard, plastic, or other durable materials may be stronger.

Is it easier to make a model of an animal cell or a plant cell?

It depends, because plant cells have more functions, but it is easier to distribute the organelles onto a flat, rectangular surface. The animal cell has less functions, but it is more difficult to distribute it, since it is circular.

With what will I cut the Styrofoam?

You can use an X-acto knife or any sharp, flat tool that will cut it straight enough.

What kind of paint should I use to color the Styrofoam ball?

Just use pva glue mixed into paint from a bottle. You can buy these from home bargains or hobby shops.

What crafts can be used for ribosomes and vacuoles?

You can use little bits of cotton for ribosomes and medium size Styrofoam or medium size cotton balls and then be creative.

How long do these models take to make?

If you are quick about it, it will take you one to two hours when using craft items; if you want to be particular about items, it may take five to 15 hours.

How can I make the shape of a mitochondria in an animal cell?

Try orange slices. They have always looked like mitochondria to me.

You can paint each thing whatever colors you wish to use.

What if I want to make the organelles out of paper, plastic, or other things?

If thats what you want to do, go for it. No one can stop you from expressing yourself artistically, as long as you are delivering an accurate representation.

Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered.

Youll be able to add parts more quickly if you have a friend or parent help.

Make sure the gelatin has enough time to solidify after you have added the organelles. Try to keep it in the fridge overnight.

You might want to papier-mâch the styrofoam for safety reasons. Add extra layers for good measure.

Its better if you mix your paint with glue if you want to paint your styrofoam balls because it gives it a more even texture and they last longer than if you paint with just paint.

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3D printing with Two Colors A basic guide

HomeGuides/ 3D printing with Two Colors A basic guide

3D printing with Two Colors A basic guide

So you have a dual head printer, but how do you make a two color print?

Making multi-colored prints can be a little frustrating at first, but the process itself is quite simple.

Understanding how a 3D printer uses and builds a multi-colored print will help you to troubleshoot any problems you may encounter.

Each color of the model that you wish to print is separated into different individual STL objects and then assigned to a particular extruder.

Once each of the STL objects is set, the models are combined and sent to the 3D printer to be printed. For example, if you were printing out a gaming dice, the white square of the die would be one object and the black dots representing the numbers would be a second object. The two separate objects are printed in one pass, combining them as the print progresses.

Thankfully, many models (like the cat in our article image) can be found prepared for dual extruder 3D printers. A quick search on 3D model download siteThingiversewill provide you with plenty of dual extruder 3D models to get you printing in two colors straight away. Well, almost.

Before you can print out a two color model, you need to tell your 3D printer which part is which color. How you choose which extruder (color) is used depends on which piece of software you use to interface with your printer. You should check the documents of your specific software before you begin, as each process will vary.

For simple ease of use, I personally like to use MakerBots MakerWare for all my dual color prints. Each STL model is easy to select and a few quick clicks sets which extruder to use. The key thing that I like about MakerWare over another software such as ReplicatorG is that MakerWare feels more intuitive, as you can see all the parts of your model on the virtual print bed, where as with ReplicatorG, the two models are assigned an extruder then combined.

First thing is first, a common misconception is that using two extruders will make your models print quicker. Thats not strictly false, as using two extruders will save you time switching filaments, but its not really how dual extruders work. To learn more, check out our guideDual extruder printers What you need to know.

Aside from the model preparation and setup process outlined above, the normal problems than can occur with 3D prints will probably happen to your two color prints. It is always good to check that your build plate is preheated, that your printer is on a level and firm surface, and that your extruders are properly calibrated.

See easy when you know how. 🙂

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New 3D Printed Organ Models Dont Just Look Like Real Organs, They Feel and React Like Them Too

byClare ScottDec 6, 20173D Design3D PrintingMedical 3D PrintingPopular StoriesScience & Technology

There is plenty of evidence to show that 3D printed anatomical models greatlyimprove the outcomesof medical procedures. When surgeons can plan and practice an operation on a perfect 3D printed replica of a patients organ, surgeries tend totake less time, as does recovery. But there are still limitations to the 3D printed organs being used today. They may look exactly like patients individual organs, as theyre created from CT and MRI scan data, but theyre only replicas in the visual sense. Theyre still typically made from hard plastic, so theyll have a completely different feel than a live organ, plus theyre extremely difficult to cut into, making surgical planning more of a visual endeavor. They wont react the way an actual organ will react during surgery, either.

This is not to say that 3D printed organ models arent extremely useful, butcould they be made to bemoreuseful? They sure can, says a team of researchers led by theUniversity of Minnesota. The researchers have 3D printed organ models that not only look like actual organs, they feel like them and have the same mechanical properties. They even have soft sensors that provide feedback to let surgeons know how much pressure they can apply without tissue damage, for example.

The research was published in a paper entitled 3D Printed Organ Models with Physical Properties of Tissue and Integrated Sensors, which you can accesshere.

We are developing next-generation organ models for pre-operative practice. The organ models we are 3D printing are almost a perfect replica in terms of the look and feel of an individuals organ, using our custom-built 3D printers, said lead researcher Michael McAlpine, an associate professor of mechanical engineering in the University of Minnesotas College of Science and Engineering and a 2017 recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

We think these organ models could be game-changers for helping surgeons better plan and practice for surgery. We hope this will save lives by reducing medical errors during surgery.

The team was initially contacted by Dr. Robert Sweet, a urologist formerly from the University of Minnesota now working at theUniversity of Washington.He was looking for better 3D models of the prostate. The researchers took MRI scans and tissue samples from the prostates of three patients, then they developed customized silicone-based 3D printing inks that can be tuned to precisely match the mechanical properties of each patients individual prostate so theyre not just 3D printing a model that feels like a prostate, theyre 3D printing a model that feels like a specific patients prostate.

The models were 3D printed in the universitys custom-built 3D printer, then soft 3D printed sensors were attached. The researchers then observed how the models reacted to compression tests and a variety of surgical tools.

The sensors could give surgeons real-time feedback on how much force they can use during surgery without damaging the tissue, said Kaiyan Qiu, a University of Minnesota mechanical engineering postdoctoral researcher and lead author of the paper. This could change how surgeons think about personalized medicine and pre-operative practice.

The researchers hope to proceed further by 3D printing models of more complicated organs, using multiple inks. Surgeons could use these to actually practice removing a tumor, for example, and test different methods to see which is the most successful before operating on the patient. McAlpine has goals that go beyond even that, however.

If we could replicate the function of these tissues and organs, we might someday even be able to create bionic organs for transplants, McAlpine said. I call this the Human X project. It sounds a bit like science fiction, but if these synthetic organs look, feel, and act like real tissue or organs, we dont see why we couldnt 3D print them on demand to replace real organs.

Authors of the paper include Kaiyan Qiu, Zichen Zhao, Ghazaleh Haghiashtiani, Shuang-Zhuang Guo, Mingyu He, Ruitao Su, Zhijie Zhu, Didarul B. Bhuiyan, Paari Murugan, Fanben Meng, Sung Hyun Park, Chih-Chang Chu, Brenda M. Ogle, Daniel A. Saltzman, Badrinath R. Konety, Robert M. Sweet and Michael C. McAlpine.

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Researchers 3D print lifelike artificial organ models

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Researchers 3D print lifelike artificial organ models

Organ models could improve surgical outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide

MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (12/06/2017)  A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has 3D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the exact anatomical structure, mechanical properties, and look and feel of real organs. These patient-specific organ models, which include integrated soft sensors, can be used for practice surgeries to improve surgical outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide.

The research was published today in the journalAdvanced Materials Technologies.The researchers are submitting a patent on this technology.

We are developing next-generation organ models for pre-operative practice. The organ models we are 3D printing are almost a perfect replica in terms of the look and feel of an individuals organ, using our custom-built 3D printers, said lead researcher Michael McAlpine, an associate professor of mechanical engineering in the University of Minnesotas College of Science and Engineering and a 2017 recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE).

We think these organ models could be game-changers for helping surgeons better plan and practice for surgery. We hope this will save lives by reducing medical errors during surgery, McAlpine added.

McAlpine said his team was originally contacted by Dr. Robert Sweet, a urologist at the University of Washington who previously worked at the University of Minnesota. Sweet was looking for more accurate 3D printed models of the prostate to practice surgeries.

Currently, most 3D printed organ models are made using hard plastics or rubbers. This limits their application for accurate prediction and replication of the organs physical behavior during surgery. There are significant differences in the way these organs look and feel compared to their biological counterparts. They can be too hard to cut or suture. They also lack an ability to provide quantitative feedback.

In this study, the research team took MRI scans and tissue samples from three patients prostates. Researchers tested the tissue and developed customized silicone-based inks that can be tuned to precisely match the mechanical properties of each patients prostate tissue. These unique inks were used in a custom-built 3D printer by researchers at the University of Minnesota. The researchers then attached soft, 3D printed sensors to the organ models and observed the reaction of the model prostates during compression tests and the application of various surgical tools.

The sensors could give surgeons real-time feedback on how much force they can use during surgery without damaging the tissue, said Kaiyan Qiu, a University of Minnesota mechanical engineering postdoctoral researcher and lead author of the paper. This could change how surgeons think about personalized medicine and pre-operative practice.

In the future, researchers hope to use this new method to 3D print lifelike models of more complicated organs, using multiple inks. For instance, if the organ has a tumor or deformity, the surgeons would be able to see that in a patient-specific model and test various strategies for removing tumors or correcting complications. They also hope to someday explore applications beyond surgical practice.

If we could replicate the function of these tissues and organs, we might someday even be able to create bionic organs for transplants, McAlpine said. I call this the Human X project. It sounds a bit like science fiction, but if these synthetic organs look, feel, and act like real tissue or organs, we dont see why we couldnt 3D print them on demand to replace real organs.

In addition to McAlpine, Qiu and Sweet, the 17-person research team included Ghazaleh Haghiashtiani, Shuang-Zhuang Guo, Ruitao Su, Zhijie Zhu, Fanben Meng, Sung Hyun Park from the University of Minnesota Department of Mechanical Engineering; Zichen Zhao from the University of Washington WWAMI Institute for Simulation in Healthcare; Badrinath R. Konety from the University of Minnesota Department of Urology; Mingyu He and Chih-Chang Chu from Cornell University Fiber Science and Biomedical Engineering Programs; Didarul B. Bhuiyan and Brenda M. Ogle from the University of Minnesota Department of Biomedical Engineering; Daniel A. Saltzman from the University of Minnesota Department of Surgery; and Paari Murugan from the University of Minnesota Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology.

Researchers used the University of Minnesota Characterization Facility, the Polymer Characterization Facility, the Tissue Mechanics Lab, the Earl E. Bakken Medical Devices Center, the SimPORTAL, and Department of Radiology MRI equipment. The research team also received FEM simulation assistance from ANSYS, Inc.

This research was funded primarily by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), including the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute. McAlpine holds the Benjamin Mayhugh Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, which also supports his research.

To read the full research paper entitled 3D Printed Organ Models with Physical Properties of Tissue and Integrated Sensors, visit theAdvanced Materials Technologieswebsite.

Top image:Researchers used a custom-built 3D printer to print silicone-based inks can be tuned to precisely match the mechanical properties and look and feel of each patients prostate tissue. Credit: McAlpine Research GroupAbove:Researchers can attach sensors to the organ models to give surgeons real-time feedback on how much force they can use during surgery without damaging the tissue. Credit: McAlpine Research Group

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Researchers 3D-print shockingly realistic human organ models

The new organs that researchers have 3D printed dont only look like the real deal, but they also

Researchers can attach sensors to the organ models to give surgeons real-time feedback on how much force they can use during surgery without damaging the tissue. Credits: McAlpine Research Group.

3D printing has taken theworld by storm, and medicine especially can benefit from the technology. So far, people have 3D printedhuman cartilageskin, and evenartificial limbs and weve just started to scratch the surface of what 3D printing can do. Now, researchers from the University of Minnesota have developed artificial organ models which look incredibly realistic.

We are developing next-generation organ models for pre-operative practice. The organ models we are 3D printing are almost a perfect replica in terms of the look and feel of an individuals organ, using our custom-built 3D printers,said lead researcher Michael McAlpine, an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Minnesotas College of Science and Engineering.

The 3D-printed structures not only mimic the aspect of real organs, but also the mechanical properties, look and feel of real organs. They include soft sensors which can be customized depending on the desired organ. The sensors offer real-time feedback on how much force is being applied to them, notifying doctors when they are close to damaging the organ.

The technology could help students get a better feel for real organs and learn how to improve surgical skills. For doctors, it could help them prepare for complex surgeries. Its a great step forward from previous models of artificial organs, which were generally made from hard, unrealistic plastic.

We think these organ models could be game-changers for helping surgeons better plan and practice for surgery. We hope this will save lives by reducing medical errors during surgery, McAlpine added.

In the future, researchers want to develop even more complex organs, as well as start incorporating defects or deformities. For instance, they could add a patient-specific inflammation or a tumor to an organ, based on a previous scan, enabling doctors to visualize and prepare for an intervention.

Lastly, this could ultimately pave the way for 3D-printing real, functioning organs. Theres no fundamental reason why we cant do this, its just that were not there yet. This invention could be a stepping stone for such advancements.

If we could replicate the function of these tissues and organs, we might someday even be able to create bionic organs for transplants, McAlpine said. I call this the Human X project. It sounds a bit like science fiction, but if these synthetic organs look, feel, and act like real tissue or organs, we dont see why we couldnt 3D print them on demand to replace real organs.

The research was published today in the journalAdvanced Materials Technologies.

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